26.10.2016

Bioenergy is gaining momentum in Poland

Today, Poland is very coal depended but with heavy investments planned in renewable energy sources this is rapidly changing. In July, the energy legislation was amended in order to introduce better terms for renewable energy so that it will be economically viable.
Photo text: Henryka Mościcka-Dendys, ambassador to Poland in Denmark Photo text: Henryka Mościcka-Dendys, ambassador to Poland in Denmark

“We are very depended on coal in Poland but at the same time we are amongst those countries that invest mostly in renewable energy. The government is focusing heavily on this issue and has passed a program that indicates how Poland is going to meet the demands from the EU to cut down emissions by 15 per cent in 2020. We have already reached more than 12 per cent so energy creation from renewable energy has increased,” says Henryka Mościcka-Dendys, ambassador to Poland in Denmark.

Energy legislation favours bioenergy

When it comes to electricity and heat generation based on renewal energy, wind has until now had a strong priority from the government's side. According to the ambassador, biomass is gaining a foothold as another source to energy for Poland.

“Biogas and biomass is gaining momentum in Poland and according to the government, we aim to cover up to 10 per cent of our domestic spending by biomass in 2020. The transition will be costly and painful but a new energy legislation passed in July 2016 serves to introduce better conditions for biogas and biomass,” Henryka Mościcka-Dendys explains and says further:

“This includes introducing separate auctioning and minimum prices in order to guarantee that switching from coal to biomass as an energy creation source will be economically viable.” 

“We look for best practice from Denmark”

In order to support the transition, Poland is looking for best practice from countries like Denmark that has a good track record and a lot of experience in working with renewal energy.

“This is an excellent opportunity for Danish companies that offer the full technological and quality chain which Poles value very much when looking for new business partners. Denmark offers technological solutions and has learned basic lessons concerning dialogue with the local community that we can learn from,” says Henryka Mościcka-Dendys. 

Business opportunity in rural areas

She explains further that people in Poland are looking at the governmental focus on bioenergy as an opportunity for doing business:

“They also see it as an opportunity for greener energy that can make the communities cleaner and less dependent on gas. Therefore, I see a huge interest in this issue from rural areas in Poland that are seeing this as a way of developing the local communities and creating better living standards for the citizens.”

A Polish delegation of 15 community representatives is planning to go on a study trip to the Danish island Samsø that is known for its use of renewable energy.

“When switching to renewable energy we have to convince the people on the ground that it makes sense. The trip to Samsø is one way of learning how we in Poland can have a dialogue with the local communities in order to make sure that the green transition makes sense,” says Henryka Mościcka-Dendys.